Study: Regular Handwashing Reduces Individual Risk Of Seasonal Coronavirus Infection

Study Regular handwashing reduces individual risk of seasonal coronavirus infection
Study: Regular handwashing reduces individual risk of seasonal coronavirus infection

Study: Regular handwashing reduces individual risk of seasonal coronavirus infection. In a new study looking at 1,633 participants in the influenza surveillance project across England, a team of researchers found that medium-frequency hand washing (6-10 times per day) was associated with a lower overall risk of infection. by seasonal coronavirus.

Handwashing is minimally detrimental and socially acceptable in a wide variety of community settings and plays an important role in measures such as physical and social disturbances, as well as awareness-raising and decreased transmission. Handwashing is minimally detrimental and socially acceptable in a wide variety of community settings and plays an important role in measures such as physical and social disturbances, as well as awareness-raising and decreased transmission. Sincerely Image: Zukunfatsicher

The evidence of global spread of COVID-19 is an evidence-based public health response. Seasonal strains of human coronavirus (NL63, OC43, 229E, and HKU1) as well as SARS-CoV-2, a new coronavirus that causes COVID-19 disease, by secretion and, through direct and indirect contact with droplets, is transmitted from To an unknown extent by aerosols.

Health officials and public health experts recommend hand hygiene measures to inhibit these transmission mechanisms by preventing viral transfer through contact with infected people and surfaces. Although hand hygiene recommendations are acceptable in various community settings around the world and are widely recommended by health authorities, assessment of their effects on disease risk in the general population is limited.

First author Sarah Belle, a researcher at University College London (UCL) and the UCL Institute of Health Informatics Public Health Data Science Research Group, said: "It is important to note that the frequency of hands is only one aspect of hand hygiene. "Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care.

"We also know that in terms of long-lasting handwashing and handwashing, eg, before returning home or eating, it is associated with an increased overall risk of illnesses like the flu or flu." You should practice good hand hygiene at all times, whether or not you notice symptoms. It will help protect yourself and prevent the virus from spreading inadvertently to others around you.

For the study, Beal and colleagues used data from three successive winter cohorts (2006 to 2009) from the Flu Watch study, a national prospective national cohort study examining influenza and other acute respiratory infections across England. Transmission, burden, and risk factors associated with the problems were investigated. .

Most of the participants (about 80%) were adults over the age of sixteen. They provided basic estimates of hand hygiene behavior. Coronavirus infection from inflammation of the nose was identified by RT-PCR. To assess the overall frequency of handwashing, participants were asked at baseline each season how many times did you wash your hands yesterday.

The frequency of daily handwashing was subsequently classified as low (daily 5 times a day), moderate (6-10 times a day), or high (> 10 times a day), around influenza-like illnesses in healthcare settings. western community. It is directed by K. Sahitya. The outcome of interest was whether the participants had contracted any PCR-confirmed coronovirus infection at any time.

The detected coronavirus strains (NL63, OC43 and 229E) were added to the binary result (yes / no coronoviruses) because the effect of hand hygiene is believed to be consistent with these strains. Moderate-frequency hand washing was associated with a decrease in the overall risk of cornovirus contraction (36% reduction in the risk of infection compared to those who wash their hands 0 to 5 times per day).

There was no significant dose-response effect for high intensity hand washing. "Regular hand washing can help us keep infection rates low and reduce transmission," said lead author Ellen Fragasji, a researcher at the UCL Institute of Health Informatics and the Department of Public Health Data Science Group. Epidemiology of infectious diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Since COVID-19 exhibits transmission mechanisms similar to seasonal coronaviruses, these findings support a clear public health message about the protective effects of handwashing during epidemics. The findings appear in the journal Welcome Open Research.


Washing hands 6-10 times a day associated with a reduced risk of infection
Washing hands 6-10 times a day associated with a reduced risk of infection

Washing hands 6-10 times a day associated with a reduced risk of infection. According to a new UCL study, moderate frequency hand washing is associated with a lower risk of seasonal coronavirus infection six to ten times a day. Pending research and peer review, published in Welcome Open Research, is the first empirical evidence that regular handwashing can reduce individual risk of seasonal coronovirus infections.

It is based on data from three successive winter cohorts (2006 to 2009) from the England Flu Surveillance Study. Sarah Belle (UCL Institute for Health Informatics), Ph.D. The researcher and first author of the study stated: "Since COVID-19 exhibits transmission mechanisms similar to seasonal coronaviruses, these findings support a clear public health message about the protective effects of handwashing during epidemics."

"It is important to note that the frequency of hand washing is only one aspect of hand hygiene. We also know that in the context of long periods of hand washing and hand washing, such as before returning home or before eating, less flu or flu There are general risks associated with various diseases.

"Good hand hygiene should be practiced at all times, regardless of whether you show symptoms or not. This will help protect you and prevent the spread of the virus to others around you." For this study, 1,633 participants provided initial estimates of hand hygiene behavior, and coronovirus infections were identified with nasal swabs. Most of the participants (about 80%) were adults over the age of sixteen.

To assess the overall frequency of hand washing, participants were asked about the beginning of each season to "estimate how many times they washed their hands yesterday." The frequency of daily hand washing was subsequently classified as low (daily 5 times a day), moderate (6-10 times a day), or high (> 10 times a day) in western community settings surrounding diseases similar to flu. It was led by literature.

Moderate-frequency hand washing was associated with a decrease in the overall risk of cornovirus contraction (36% reduction in the risk of infection compared to those who wash their hands 0 to 5 times per day). There was no significant dose-response effect for high intensity hand washing. The analysis was adjusted according to the age and condition of the health worker, both with hygiene practices and due to the increased risk of coronavirus infection.

Ellen Fragazzi, (UCL Institute of Health Informatics and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), principal investigator and final author of the study, concluded: Something as simple as washing your hands regularly makes us lower infection rates. It can help maintain. And reduce transmission.

Washing your hands six to 10 times a day can reduce the risk of coronovirus. According to research, washing your hands six to 10 times a day is found to be associated with a lower risk of seasonal coronovirus, supporting the public health guide for COVID-19 outbreaks.

Regular handwashing can reduce individual risk of infection, indicates a study that has not been peer-reviewed. Moderate frequency handwashing was associated with a 36 percent reduction in risk of coronovirus infection compared to those who washed their hands zero to five times per day.

The researchers say that washing your hands more than 10 times a day has no added benefit. Currently, this document is a 'preprint', meaning it is weighted by a group of scientists who will assess whether the conclusions drawn from the science and method, analysis and data hold.

The peer review process is designed to address errors, misinterpretations, or faulty investigative methods. But to speed up research delivery (since the peer review process takes time), scientists publish documents to preprint archives.

Read more about the spread of COVID-19 - Coronavirus: should we all be wearing face masks? Coronavirus: Will COVID-19 become a seasonal virus? Dr. of the Institute of Health Informatics at University College London (UCL). Sarah Beale and the study's first author stated, "Since COVID-19 exhibits transmission mechanisms similar to seasonal coronaviruses, these findings support a clear public message about protection. Effects of handwashing during the epidemic.

“It is important to highlight the frequency of hand washing, which is only one aspect of hand hygiene. We also know that both the handwashing period and the handwashing reference, e.g. Before going home or eating: They have been associated with a lower overall risk of illnesses like the flu or flu.

“Good hand hygiene must be practiced at all times, whether it shows symptoms or not. This will help protect yourself and prevent the virus from spreading inadvertently to others around you. “Something as simple as regular hand washing can help us keep infection rates low and reduce transmission.

The research, published in Welcome Open Research, is based on data from three consecutive winter colleagues (2006 to 2009) from a comprehensive flu surveillance study in England. For the study, 1,633 participants provided initial estimates of hand hygiene behavior, and coronovirus infection was identified using a nasal swab. About 80 percent of the participants were over the age of 16.

At the beginning of each season, contestants were asked to calculate how many times they had washed their hands the day before. The frequency of daily hand washing was subsequently classified as low, zero to five times a day, moderate, six to 10 times a day, or high, more than 10 times a day.

The authors write: “This is the first empirical evidence that regular hand washing can reduce individual risk of infection with the seasonal coronavirus. These findings support a clear public health message about the protective effects of handwashing in the context of the current COVID-19 epidemic. "The research was funded by the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust.

What is the R number and why is it relevant to coronaviruses? The breeding number, often called the R value or R number, is a measure of disease outbreaks. It tells us how many people an infected person will go through the disease. The R number for COVID-19, which is being cited in the media and in government reports, is known as the 'effective' reproduction number. This value can go up and down.

We can reduce R by making the disease more difficult to spread, by implementing measures such as social unrest, closing restaurants and nonessential stores, and encouraging people to stay home. Each disease also has a 'basic' reproduction number, R0, which is the fixed value of R if no remedy is taken. For example, measles is highly contagious, with an R0 as high as 18, while COVID-19 has an R0 of about three.

So if COVID-19 is allowed to spread in the population, an infected person can transmit the disease to three other people on average. But if all these people practice physical disorders, then the virus cannot spread so easily and the effective value of R decreases.

The important thing is to keep R to 1. If we can do this, the number of new cases will decrease and its outbreak will eventually decrease. Conversely, if R increases above 1, we risk a rapidly increasing number of cases that would require stronger measures to keep the virus under control. Because of this, governments use R to evaluate what we are doing in our efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and, if necessary, to adjust their actions.



Manual hand washing six to 10 times a day is associated with a lower risk of coronavirus infection
Manual hand washing six to 10 times a day is associated with a lower risk of coronavirus infection

Manual hand washing six to 10 times a day is associated with a lower risk of coronavirus infection. Hand washing six to 10 times a day is associated with a lower risk of seasonal coronaviruses, supporting public health guidance on measures for the Kovid-19 outbreak.

Regular handwashing can reduce personal risk of infection, a study that has not been peer-reviewed. Moderate frequency handwashing was associated with a 36% reduction in the risk of coronavirus infection by those who washed their hands from zero to five times per day.

Sorry, this content is not available on your device. Good hand hygiene should be practiced at all times, whether or not you notice symptoms. The researchers say there was no significant dose-response effect for high-intensity handwashing. Sarah Beale of the University College London (UCL) Institute of Health Informatics, and the study's first author, said:

Because Kovid-19 exhibits transmission mechanisms similar to seasonal coronaviruses, these findings support a clear public health message about the protective effects of handwashing during epidemics. It is important to note that the frequency of hand washing is only one aspect of hand hygiene.

We also know that in terms of long-lasting handwashing and handwashing, e.g. Before going home or eating: They have been associated with a lower overall risk of illnesses like the flu or flu. Good hand hygiene should be practiced at all times, whether or not you notice symptoms.

This will help protect yourself and prevent the virus from spreading inadvertently to others around you. The research, published in Welcome Open Research, is based on data from three consecutive winter colleagues (2006 to 2009) from a comprehensive flu surveillance study in England. For the study, 1,633 participants provided initial estimates of hand hygiene behavior, and coronovirus infection was identified using a nasal swab.

About 80% of the participants were over the age of 16. At the beginning of each season, contestants were asked to calculate how many times they had washed their hands the day before. The frequency of daily hand washing was subsequently classified as low, zero to five times a day, medium, six to 10 times a day, or high, more than 10 times a day.

Ellen Fragasji of the UCL Institute of Health Informatics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said: "Something as simple as washing your hands regularly can help us keep infection rates low and reduce transmission."

The authors write: “This is the first empirical evidence that regular hand washing can reduce personal risk of acquiring seasonal coronavirus infections. "These findings support a clear public health message about the protective effects of handwashing in the context of the current Kovid-19 epidemic."

The research was funded by the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust.




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