Archaeologists Locate The Giant Ring Of The Well Near Stonehenge

Archaeologists locate the giant ring of the well near Stonehenge
Archaeologists locate the giant ring of the well near Stonehenge

Archaeologists locate the giant ring of the well near Stonehenge. Archaeologists have discovered a 4,500-year-old ring around the great Hegde at the famous site of Durrington Walls and Woodhenge, just a few kilometers from Stonehenge in southern Britain. The 2 kilometer wide ring surrounds the great heng at Durrington Walls and the famous Woodhenge site.

The newly discovered circle has a diameter of more than 2 km and is carbon dated to 2500 BCE. Archaeologists have identified as many as 20 axes, which are up to 10 meters long and at least 5 meters deep, but estimates may originally be greater than 30. "The axes and circuits surrounding the Darrington walls are unprecedented in the Kingdom United, "said Professor Vince Gaffney, a researcher at the University of Bradford School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences.

"It demonstrates the importance of Durrington Walls Heng, the complexity of monumental structures within the Stonehenge landscape, and the ability and willingness of Neolithic communities to register their cosmological belief systems and on a scale that we have never anticipated before." Tax. "Scientists believe Duffington has a range of Ring of the Rings around the massive hedge.

Along the internal post line, the facilities could guide people to religious sites and warn others not to cross the border. "It was extraordinary that such an important discovery was made so close to Stonehenge," said Professor Gaffney. Professor Wolfgang Neubauer said: "It is surprising that our continued study of the Stonehenge landscape, which applies the latest technology and extends to the field, has revealed important new features, including these huge wells."

Archaeologist at the Ludwig Boltzman Institute for Archaeological Prospecting and the Institute of Virtual Archeology / VIAS-Vienna for the Science of Archeology at the University of Vienna. "Not only are they clearly visible in the geophysical data set, the survey provided an opportunity to put these features in a broader context, including many monuments associated with Stonehenge, including the Super-Hang on the Durrington Walls to the north." - Just one km east. The iconic stone circle. "

"The Stonehenge landscape is distinguished, not only one of the most important archaeological landscapes in the world, but also among the best studied", Dr. Archeologist, University of Birmingham. Eamon Baldwin said. "It is remarkable to make such an important discovery within that field, and how archaeologists have begun to integrate technology with traditional research methods, including excavations and aerial photographic studies."

Professor Henry Chapman, an archaeologist at the University of Birmingham, said: "After studying the Stonehenge landscape, the discovery of such an incredible monument is a testament to the value of interdisciplinary research." "Our understanding of this great location has changed in recent years, and the identification of such a comprehensive and important new site highlights that there is always something more to discover."

"We are very excited about the possibility of applying ancient sedimentary DNA technology to these mysterious structures to discover our purpose in ancient Britain," said Professor Robin Allaby, a researcher at the University of Warwick. This research is reported in an article published on June 21, 2020 in the Journal of Internet Archeology.


Archaeologists discover a large Neolithic circle of axes near Stonehenge.
Archaeologists discover a large Neolithic circle of axes near Stonehenge

Archaeologists discover a large Neolithic circle of axes near Stonehenge. The discovery of a prehistoric structure spanning 1.2 miles has opened new lines of investigation into the mysterious Stonehenge. The axes indicate that the first inhabitants had developed a way of calculating.
 
Archaeologists have found a wide circle of deep wells around an ancient settlement near the Stonehenge World Heritage site, describing it as the largest prehistoric structure ever built in the UK. The site is located about 2 miles (about 3 kilometers) northeast of Stastonhagen Salisbury Plain. Evidence suggests that the axis dates back to the same period about 4,500 years ago.

On Monday, a team of archaeologists from various universities announced the discovery of the axis of the axis, calling it an engineering masterpiece. Prehistoric structures, 1.2 miles (2 km) in diameter, each approximately 10 m (33 ft) wide and 5 m deep, surround the Durrington Walls settlement.


Red dots on the axes are uncovered
Red dots on the axes are uncovered

Red dots on the axes are uncovered and plot circles predict how they can be arranged around Durrington's walls. "This is an unprecedented discovery of great importance within Britain," said Vincent Gaffney, a leading archaeologist on the project. He added: "Top researchers have advanced their picture and are close to Stokhenhage down to the scale of the structure and the fact that it was not discovered until now."

Using remote sensing techniques and samples, archaeologists were able to search without the need for excavation. "I can't emphasize enough effort to dig a hole that big with stone, wood and bone tools," said Gaffney. "We are beginning to see things that we could never see through standard archeology, things that we could not imagine."

However, the archaeologist said around 20 axes were found, but there could be more than 30. He explained that around 40% of the circle is not available for study as a result of modern studies. Archaeologists said Shaft's "impressive" circle revealed the desire of Neolithic communities to enter their belief systems.

"This demonstrates the importance of Durrington Walls Heng, the complexity of monumental structures within the Stonehenge landscape, and the ability and willingness of Neolithic communities to record their cosmological belief systems, and on a scale that we have never anticipated before." It was imposed, ”said Gaffney.


An artist's impression of what Durrington's walls would look like
An artist's impression of what Durrington's walls would look like

An artist's impression of what Durrington's walls would look like; The discovery of the structure appears as a large ring around the structure. Bradford University archaeologists said the plan involved in hiring a prehistoric structure of this magnitude should include a counting or counting system. He said the finding is even more extraordinary because it offers the first evidence that the first inhabitants of the United Kingdom, mainly farming communities, had developed a counting system.

The mysterious Stonehenge, whose purpose is still unknown today, despite decades of research, is one of Britain's best-known landmarks, attracting both tourists and those seeking spiritual connections with nature. Gaffney stated: "Stonehenge has a clear link to the passage of time and time through the summer solstice. But with the Durrington axes, it is not the passage of time, but the union of one axis of the axis that has a temporary meaning, "Gaffney said.

The summer solstice, forcing people to perform their annual rituals, which took place in a larger-than-usual expulsion. The area around Stonehenge on the Salisbury Plain extends to other important sites in the old British civilizations, such as the great wheelbarrows and the walls of Durrington, as well as the mountainous areas of the Iron Age, such as Silbury Hill. Not far away, in Wiltshire, the village of Avebury is considered to be Britain's largest megalithic stone ring.

 

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